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Oracle refocuses its FS1 storage array into its public cloud

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July 20, 2017

According to what we've been observing in the past few weeks, it looks like Oracle is refocusing its FS1 storage array into its own public cloud, away from on-premises sales. It's a bit early to see if this is a new trend, however. But it is an observation.

FS1 is a hybrid flash/disk array that was designed for racks back in 2014 with dual active controllers, fans and non-volatile mirrored cache. It scaled to about 912 TB of flash, and up to 2.9 PB of combined flash and disk capacity.

An all-flash FS1 arrived in mid-2015, scaling from 2 TB to 912 TB. This seemed to be an improved version with its disk drive enclosures taken away and a 30 x 2U drive enclosure scale-up scheme retained.

Since then, the erratic initiative by Oracle to get its on-premises customers to move to the Oracle Cloud has intensified somewhat. At least that's what it looks like.

This is partly in response to dropping hardware sales at Oracle as enterprise customers chose commodity-priced but competing x86 servers and partly because of the steady ascent of AWS and Azure into enterprise database processing credibility.

Asked about the FS1, an Oracle spokesperson said-- "The FS1 product is being internally focused on Oracle’s Cloud, moving forward."

If Oracle customers are going to move to the public cloud, then Oracle would want to make sure they move to its own public cloud. There are diverging trends between hardware and the cloud in Oracle's revenues over the past few quarters.

It would appear that Oracle has decided to turn away from the on-premises all-flash array competition with the FS1 and refocus it.

The product is still on Oracle's engineered hardware products webpage per se, but its "Learn More About" details link results in a "We can't find the page you were looking for" message... (!)

To be sure, other incumbent storage hardware suppliers are finding revenues from on-premises all-flash array sales are growing. Witness Dell, HPE, IBM and NetApp as some examples of that.

Oracle seems to want to buck the trend because it sees the future differently from the others. It will be interesting to see how all of this pans out in the next two quaters.

Source: Oracle.


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