Information Technology News.


Stanford University pilots new version of its computer science course

Share on Twitter.

Sponsered ad: Get a Linux Enterprise server with 92 Gigs of RAM, 16 CPUs and 8 TB of storage at our liquidation sale. Only one left in stock.

Sponsered ad: Order the best SMTP service for your business. Guaranteed or your money back.

April 24, 2017

Two weeks ago, Stanford University began piloting a new version of its introductory computer science course numbered CS 106-A.

Its variant, the CS 106-J, is taught in JavaScript rather than just Java. "CS 106-J covers the same basic course material as CS 106-A but does so using JavaScript, the most common language for implementing interactive web pages, instead of Java," the university website explains.

"No prior programming experience is required," it adds. According to The Stanford Daily, Eric Roberts, emeritus professor of computer science, has been working on the transition since mid-2012, then writing a new textbook, creating assignments, and training teaching assistants, etc.

In fact, with the help of other university workers, Roberts originally wrote the Java textbook still used in CS 106A, The Art & Science of Java.

Released in mid-1995, Java actually began being taught at Stanford in 2002. For the decade before that, Stanford's computer science department focused on the C programming language.

And before that, CS 106A was taught in Pascal, as could be expected. Roberts, who was not immediately available to discuss the change, told The Stanford Daily that Java is showing its age and that JavaScript has more or less taken its place as a web language in the past two years.

And there's no doubt about that. Questions about whether Java is on its way out have been surfacing for several years already, particularly since Oracle's takeover of Sun Microsystems and Java in 2010.

Many programmers who believe in open-source software would be happy to see Java die on its own if only to get back at Oracle, a company seen as very hostile to the open source model.

There are sure signs that the overall interest in Java is dropping rapidly, for those who see validity in tools like Google Trends is on the increase and the trend seems to be accelerating.

But for now anyway, the reality is that Java is still alive somewhat, generating a few programming jobs and still healthy enough to be around probably another ten to fifteen years.

For example, just consider that COBOL, designed in 1959, is still being used in 2017 and it gives you a rough idea of how 'sticky' a language can be at times.

Despite its dwindling desktop presence, Java is the language of choice for the world's most widely used consumer-facing operating system, Linux-based Android, and it continues to be essential for business systems as well.

Java was ranked the number one programming language in both April 2017 and 2016. For its part, JavaScript was ranked number 8 this year, down from number 7 in 2016.

RedMonk, a consultant firm that tracks programming language popularity, updated its biannual ranking platform in March and placed JavaScript at the top of the list, ahead of second-placed Java, so there's definetely something big happening here.

Source: RedMonk Consultants LLC.


Sponsered ad: Get a Linux Enterprise server with 92 Gigs of RAM, 16 CPUs and 8 TB of storage at our liquidation sale. Only one left in stock.

Sponsered ad: Order the best SMTP service for your business. Guaranteed or your money back.

Share on Twitter.

IT News Archives | Site Search | Advertise on IT Direction | Contact | Home

All logos, trade marks or service marks on this site are the property of their respective owners.

Sponsored by Sure Mail™, Avantex and
by Montreal Server Colocation.

       © IT Direction. All rights reserved.