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More on Oracle's new 12cR2 database solution

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March 2, 2017

Oracle database administrators who weren't excited to test drive the new 12cR2 in the cloud can now check it out on their own infrastructure.

Oracle has been pressuring customers a bit in an effort to buy its products as-a-service by initially distributing the updated second release of Oracle Database 12 (12cR2) on a cloud-only basis.

The effort has had mixed results so far. Today, arriving on-premises, is the exact same product, although Oracle's cloud service is intended to provide automatic provisioning of various configurations to make the overall management a little easier for less experienced users. Or so we are told, anyway.

Oracle's new 12cR2 introduces a few new features, including the ability to horizontally partition or share a large database across a pool of independent instances, each with their own server and storage features.

However, Oracle's multitenant capability also provides a database consolidation model in which multiple Pluggable Databases (PDBs) are consolidated within a Container Database (CDB), allowing the PDBs to share the memory and background processes of a common CDB, while also keeping the isolation aspects of single databases.

The new 12cR2 is now downloadable for Linux and SPARC, specifically for Linux x86-64, Oracle Solaris (SPARC systems, 64-bit), and Oracle Solaris (x86 systems, 64-bit).

These versions arrive first because Big Red's database is almost entirely written on Oracle Linux 6 x86-64, though some DBAs maintain a degree of incredulity regarding whether parts are written on Solaris.

Nevertheless, this is why those releases are the first to arrive before being ported to other platforms.

The 12cR2's eventual availability for Windows is expected, as happened for 12cR1. Considering the length of time 12cR1 has been around, and users' slow move to the change, it is likely going to be several years before 12cR2 begins to be adopted by businesses.

Oracle's cloud-only move was an attempt to drive customers to its cloud services as well, but as with its new release, the overall uptake for serious enterprise customers is minimal.

The majority of enterprise customers running Oracle databases are doing so on-premises, while the few that are using Oracle database in the cloud are not really using Oracle Public Cloud to do so. We'll keep you updated on this.

Source: Oracle.


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