< More on the MicroProfile enterprise Java project
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More on the MicroProfile enterprise Java project

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December 23, 2016

It appears that a rather humble project for a microservices-friendly Java is apparently to be managed by the Eclipse Foundation, according to various sources.

To be sure, the MicroProfile project has been accepted by the Eclipse Foundation Board following a vote late yesterday.

For readers that are not familiar, MicroProfile is a lightweight outline of enterprise Java services using existing elements of the Java EE stack.

The MicroProfile initiative is relatively new, and its early backers sought stewardship outside the JCP following Oracle's exit of the Java EE 8 several months ago.

However, MicroProfile's original licensing program might have to change, some observers suggest.

The Eclipse Foundation, famed for the Eclipse open-source tools framework, has asked the MicroProfile managers to re-consider the initially proposed dual licensing methods.

That would simply mean that code already existing under its current Apache License 2.0 agreement would be eligible but also the project’s Eclipse Public License as well, and that's where things get a bit obscure.

Eclipse executive director Mike Milinkovich in welcoming MicroProfile to the organization has offered his group’s assistance in getting permissions from various contributors whose code is now under the Apache Foundation license.

EPL would support the conventions of the Eclipse community and “support the copying of code between various projects within the Eclipse community,” Milinkovich asserted the development community.

Milinkovich added: “There is no downside to early adopters in having this dual license in place, however. So on behalf of the Eclipse community, I would respectfully ask that you consider this request.”

But the dual-licensing scheme could be a problem, nevertheless. IBM Java EE Architect and JPA senior manager for WebSphere Kevin Sutter responded: “We will need to consider this dual licensing request. Some members of the developer community had very strong opinions on not using the dual licensing concept, but that may have been specific to the EPL+BSD route. We'll soon get back with you on that.”

Apache’s licence is considered business friendly as it does not require derivative works or modifications to be distributed using the same licence-- a big plus in the corporate world, and one that Big Blue is in love with for obvious reasons.

The EPL allows limited copying, modification and distribution, however. Changes and additions that constitute a derivative work must be licensed under the same terms and conditions of the EPL, and both are Open-Source-Initiative-approved licences.

Source: The Eclipse Foundation.


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