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Red Hat modifies its OpenStack support plan

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November 10, 2016

Earlier today, Red Hat said it has made a few modifications to its OpenStack support plan to take advantage of Agile with businesses that prefer a longer term commitment following a shakeup in its engineering team.

Due in the next few weeks, and based on the Newton OpenStack Platform V. 10, it will see Red Hat introduce one and three-year lifecycle support plans for two new editions.

Overall, one-year support will be applied to the Red Hat OpenStack Platform every six months or so. This will provide the latest features in the OpenStack cloud code and target those that need new capabilities and working in Agile shops.

A second Red Hat release will be delivered every 1 1/2 year and will come wrapped with a three-year support guarantee. You'll have the option to top this up with an additional one to two years of extended support, taking the OpenStack package to five years in total.

Such a more conservative option will target those outside the cutting edge looking for proven feature capabilities upon which to build longer term infrastructure.

Until now, Red Hat has offered just one package of OpenStack Platform with phased, three years of production support. Now all of that is changed.

Year one was technical support, security updates, bug fixes, back porting of new features, installer updates and new partner additions.

Years two and three eliminated back porting, installed updates and partner additions. Red Hat appears adamant about these new changes.

Radhesh Balakrishnan, Red Hat OpenStack general manager, told us that the need for two support modes had become apparent within the last twelve months.

"We have seen everything within companies from projects that want to move fast to some who want to go a lot slower," Balakrishnan asserted. "It all depends on the use case for building the OpenStack infrastructure," he added.

Naturally, the hope will be that once Red Hat has the Agile crew, an organization will remain with Red Hat's OpenStack as more and more developers move to ops and infrastructure.

To deliver its two-step OpenStack release, Red Hat had to shake up its engineering team somewhat. Balakrishnan said that his company has compacted its process from five months on OpenStack Platform nine to two on version ten with the aim to move to within weeks on future releases.

Overall, Red Hat has achieved this feat by performing QE and partner integration at the same time as development, test and initial release rather than as part of a sequential process, as before.

The new support policy echoes that of Linux rival Canonical on Ubuntu, which offers two models of support-- standard and Long Term Support (LTS) for its Linux OS.

LTS editions of Ubuntu ships every two years and comes with five-years Canonical support versus the nine months free support for Canonical distributions that ship every six months between those two-year benchmarks.

Source: Red Hat.


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