Information Technology News.


Intel jumps on the blockchain bandwagon and the Hyperledger

Share on Twitter.

Sponsered ad: Get a Linux Enterprise server with 92 Gigs of RAM, 16 CPUs and 8 TB of storage at our liquidation sale. Only one left in stock.

Sponsered ad: Order the best SMTP service for your business. Guaranteed or your money back.

June 21, 2016

Last week, Microsoft gave the IT community its first details of Project Bletchley, a plan to add blockchain technology into its Azure services with the use of new middleware.

"Project Bletchley is a vision for Microsoft to deliver Blockchain-as-a-Service (BaaS) that is open and flexible for all platforms, partners and customers," said Marley Gray, director of business development and strategy for cloud and enterprise at Microsoft.

Well today, the Linux Foundation's Hyperledger Project can now boast of another big name: Intel.

The project was announced in December 2015 but got its first serious push back in February when IBM also said it's moving its blockchain code into the new initiative.

Now the project has coalesced further, and is on the lookout for even more contributors. A joint proposal between IBM and Digital Assets has now become "Fabric," an incubator-level project under active development but not yet production-ready that the two firms hope will form the foundation code base of Hyperledger.

The aim with Fabric is to let components (the examples given are consensus and membership services) to be plugged in. Application logic dubbed chaincode will be hosted in containers.

Intel has now started building its own blockchain suite-- dubbed "Sawtooth Lake." Again at the incubator level, Sawtooth Lake has a consensus algorithm, called Proof of Elapsed Time (PoET), designed for "large distributed validator populations."

Intel's contribution includes its core code, the PoET validator, developer tools, and simple arcade game demonstrations of the implementation.

While Bitcoin doesn't interest big name vendors as a currency, especially in light of all the bad publicity it was subjected to in the past 2 years, the underlying concept of a blockchain, a distributed and cryptographically tamper-proof, or at least tamper-evident, record of transactions, is attractive to anyone who shifts money around.

However, there's a small problem: the blockchain implementation needs to scale, and it also needs to be secure.

Any new blockchain proposal has to be both willing to accept scrutiny, and able to survive that scrutiny – and, as we've just seen in the recent Ethereum debacle, it would be nice if the blockchain in question demonstrated its security before it starts representing real currency.

Whatever happens with blockchain technology remains interesting, especially now since the big names are starting to pour into it. It looks like this might fly sooner rather than later. We'll keep you posted.

Source: Intel.

Sponsered ad: Get a Linux Enterprise server with 92 Gigs of RAM, 16 CPUs and 8 TB of storage at our liquidation sale. Only one left in stock.

Sponsered ad: Order the best SMTP service for your business. Guaranteed or your money back.

Share on Twitter.

IT News Archives | Site Search | Advertise on IT Direction | Contact | Home

All logos, trade marks or service marks on this site are the property of their respective owners.

Sponsored by Sure Mail™, Avantex and
by Montreal Server Colocation.

       © IT Direction. All rights reserved.